Hexagons, cont.

Friday, we dove into a modified version of Christopher Danielson’s hexagon activity as partially described in my previous post. Instead of coming up with classifications for each individual shape, I asked students to group the shapes. Not a lot for them to go on. Here’s what I saw…

Types of Groupings

  • Favorite Numbers
  • These pieces fit like a puzzle
  • They’re long and skinny
  • They look the same

Not a lot of math vocabulary and it was pulling teeth in response to my guided questions trying to elucidate SOMEthing a little more precise.

Number of Groupings

  • Just enough so that each hexagon is in one group.
  • Until I asked them to mix the hexagons up again and make new groups

This number of groupings makes me really anxious for quadrilaterals. I know students struggle with the idea that a shape can be more than one classification. Any tips or suggestions?

ALSO this makes me realize that I haven’t done enough work to foster group talks in my classroom so far. I’m looking at blog posts like these to help me. Any others you would suggest?

http://infinitesums.com/commentary/2014/seating-chart-design

http://cheesemonkeysf.blogspot.com/2014/07/tmc14-gwwg-talking-points-activity.html

http://function-of-time.blogspot.com/2014/08/day-1-sooooo-school.html#gpluscomments

http://coxmath.blogspot.com/2010/07/creating-culture-of-questions.html

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Learning is having new questions to ask (thanks, Chris Danielson).

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